What would you do in this situation?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by DreamerSeeker, May 3, 2019.

  1. DreamerSeeker

    DreamerSeeker Rookie

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    May 3, 2019

    I gave my students a research project worth 20 points. They had all week to work on it with a partner, then they presented their project.

    The situation is that one student was away on a school trip for most of the week and their partner was left to do most of the work on the project. But when it was time to present, the missing student was back from the trip and they both took equal turns presenting. Should I still give credit to the student who didn't participate much due to being away on a school trip? It's not the student's fault that they weren't able to work on it due to being away, yet, their partner was the one who did 99% of the work.
     
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  3. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    May 3, 2019

    So my question is did you not realize that the research project was going to interfere with the field trip?
     
  4. DreamerSeeker

    DreamerSeeker Rookie

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    May 3, 2019

    Only one student in this class went on the field trip and I wasn't aware of it until the day after I assigned this project.
     
  5. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    May 3, 2019

    Which was how long before? In other words, how much advanced warning did you have?
     
  6. DreamerSeeker

    DreamerSeeker Rookie

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    May 3, 2019

    Put it to you this way, we returned from Easter break on Wednesday, April 24th and that was the day I explained the project to them and told them they will have until next Friday, May 3rd (which is now today) and that they will be presenting (today). Nobody told me they were going on the school trip. No heads up whatsoever, even this students' partner (and friend) didn't even know right away until later in the week when the partner texted the student to ask them where they are.

    Anyways, back to the question. Should I reward 20 points to a student who didn't get to participate with their partner?
     
  7. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    May 3, 2019

    So considering the circumstances, I would give them the opportunity to earn those points. Award the points for now, but go back and give them an individual project so that they earn the full credit on the assignment.

    But the reason I was asking was because there were other ways around the situation you've gotten into. Maybe have extended the room he frame to allow for extra time together or held off all together for a week (and did something else). We can't control the actions of others, only ourselves. If you look at it right, it could be a learning opportunity for you as a professional.
     
    readingrules12 likes this.
  8. DreamerSeeker

    DreamerSeeker Rookie

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    May 3, 2019

    An individual project would be a great idea. I will definitely keep that in mind. Thank you so much!
     
  9. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    May 3, 2019

    I would arrange for an alternate time, if one of my grade-level groups were going on a field trip.
    For your situation, have the student do the same project after school. As a placeholder, put into a "Missing" or a 0 Excused until project is completed.
     
  10. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    May 4, 2019

    My own kids' high school had over 1000 students and all kinds of trips for band, etc. The teachers would never get anything done if they accounted for every single trip. The kids were to take responsibility for their own work.

    Rude responses like yours are the reason this site is so dead.
     
  11. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    May 4, 2019

    This is so uncalled for.
     
  12. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    May 4, 2019

    Neither of these were "rude" responses. I was gathering more information about the situation in order to provide a more accurate response. The high school I teach at has in the 1500 range for students. Not only are we expected to account for field trips, we are expected to do so without a prior listing from the admin team or anything of that nature. Not only do we accomplish this, but are quite successful at it. Unfortunately we do not always get to pick and choose the hands we are dealt. But we can choose the way we play them.
     
  13. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    May 4, 2019

    Your tone came across as unkind.

    I'm sorry your school imposes that situation on you, but that does not mean all schools do the same.
     
  14. Aces

    Aces Cohort

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    May 4, 2019

    I'm sorry that you're reading too much into my tone. Teachers have a responsibility to work around things, students also have a responsibility to get assignments completed around things.
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    May 4, 2019

    I never give students credit for work that someone else did. Even when students work with a partner or in a small group, they receive individual marks based on their contributions and their demonstration of mastery of the concepts I am evaluating.

    In the case you described, I would give the student who was absent a mark for their presentation skills and would ask them to do a comparable assignment to demonstrate their mastery of the concepts that were being evaluated. Their partner would receive a mark that reflects the work they did on the assignment.
     
  16. MntnHiker

    MntnHiker Rookie

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    May 7, 2019

    When I am in this situation, I usually have the partner who is there do the assignment solo (or put them with another group if it's possible) and when the absent person comes back, s/he also does the assignment solo (or if more than one kid was absent, I may put them together). Going forward, maybe you could do something like that.

    For this situation, since they both presented, I would have the absent person earn the presentation points (do you have a rubric or a percentage of the points that are based on presenting?) So if out of 20 points, 5 is for the presentation, they would earn those five, but they'd have to make up the actual content on their own to earn the other 15. I would not give them credit for work they did not complete.
     
  17. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    May 8, 2019

    Couldn't you have postponed the presentation until the student returned and finished working on his part of the project? I would have told the partner to do his part and the missing student would have extra time to finish his part then they could put it all together.
     

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