Right when they walk in can you tell?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ios man, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. ios man

    ios man New Member

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    Jul 9, 2019

    Hi,
    Are you able to see the personalities in each child by the end of the first day and know which ones will give you trouble...know which ones you can depend on?

    thanks
    iosman
     
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  3. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Jul 9, 2019

    Definitely not! I think it takes a few days. Last year I found that some kids started off great and were challenging later on.
     
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  4. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jul 9, 2019

    I hope not. OK, it's a natural thought process to begin judging personalities upon meeting a person, but it's also a natural process for the other person to try and match those expectations. Kids are learning to do this, especially around adults--it's a survival skill. Rather than predicting personalities and behavior, I predetermine to accept each student the way they are. Of course, I also expect adherence to group norms and expect each student to fulfill their mission of learning to the best of their ability.

    A danger of predicting and preparing for, let's say, a troublemaker, is that the teacher begins to treat that student differently and causes a self-fulfilling prophecy. The same is true, (oh, how true!), for predicting which students will fall behind in certain skills--the teacher begins to limit the learning experience rather than allowing the child's individual brain to blossom; the student begins to fit into the mold of limited learning rather than beginning from where they are and connecting that to current brain expansion.

    Rachel Coleman, of Signing Time with Leah and Alex, tells how she was informed that her Deaf child, Leah, would never read above a 3rd grade reading level (whatever that is). Instead, she decided to allow Leah to just be Leah. She enriched her experiences with language (ASL), in ways in which any child would be enriched with language, and Leah far surpassed those expectations.

    I've sat in two conferences when a principal told a parent their child was limited in learning--both times without any testing verification. I felt powerless (it was early in my career) to disagree, but what an awful crush to a child's brain development! Just because a child isn't like other students in the classroom doesn't mean they can't--perhaps they haven't, but can't is a devastatingly clairvoyant prediction to make. Those predictions were also made about Albert Einstein and Thomas Edison. Were those predictions true? If so--POOF! There just went your computer and monitor!
     
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  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Jul 9, 2019

    Your super helpers will present themselves quickly, your biggest behavior issues will present themselves quickly, but the majority of the class won't. Most of the time, you won't really get a true feel for the group until a month in, once that new school year feeling has worn off.
     
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  6. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jul 9, 2019

    This. The strongest personalities will usually stand out the first day. I had a student last year who pinched my arm the first day of school and I told my para “I bet she’ll be a little tricky this year” and she was the hardest behavior kid. Everyone else it takes me a bit of time to figure out.
     
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  7. slayerr

    slayerr New Member

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    Jul 10, 2019

    I find it very difficult
     
  8. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    You'll always have first impressions, naturally, but that first day information will not always be reliable. Try to take time to speak individually with each student the first day or two, even if it's just for a moment. Circulate and ask how their day is, compliment their handwriting or coloring on a worksheet, let them know you like the same sports team that's on their shirt, and so on. A kid who was "trouble" last year may have a great year the next, especially if they start out the year on a positive note.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2019
  9. nstructor

    nstructor Cohort

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    It always takes me at least a quarter to see my students' true colors.
     
  10. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Jul 13, 2019

    Sometimes, yes. There are occasions where just looking at the names on the register before you meet them can give you some indications of the ones that may cause you problems.
     
  11. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    @blazer, how would you actually do that? Can you give an example of a "problem" name without looking like you're being bigoted?
     
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  12. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Jul 13, 2019

    Sometimes.

    I work in the same small town where I grew up. I know the majority of the families. I either went to school with them or taught their parents or taught their siblings. I know them from the neighborhood or church or court news or community news. The extremes tend to make themselves known fast, but the others take awhile. Sometimes the extremes fool you, though. I’ve had some eager helpers who were actually major turds and some behavior issues who were great kids with direction for their energies.

    You’ve got to base your initial feelings on something, but as long as you don’t hold to that as you actually learn the kids, there isn’t an issue, IMO.
     
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  13. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jul 13, 2019

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Jul 13, 2019

    In the summer program I'm working at, there's a kid who was rude to teachers the minute he walked in and has been a behavior problem (running around the school, getting out of his seat, lots of attention seeking). We knew he was going to be a challenge right away. However, he's a special case. For omst kids, I think behaviors start popping up later once they get more comfortable. I think it definitely takes a few weeks at least.

    Sometimes I think it is good to not know anything about the kids so they can have a fresh start. We were told that one of our summer program kids (who has been really good and sweet all week) purposely set off the fire alarm in elementary school and was suspended for a week. I wish we weren't told!
     
  15. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jul 13, 2019

    I would never be presumptuous enough to think that I could "read" a student in that first day or two. If you read it wrong, and act according to your wrong assessment, then you may create a problem by your actions and reactions to the student. There is no rush to "know" - let the relationship grow and evolve in a natural manner, not hindered by possibly wrong first impressions. I would hate to think that the student was making up their mind about me in that first day of activity - I think we both need time to really get to know each other.
     
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  16. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Jul 14, 2019 at 3:25 AM

    In my experience of 20+ years in a girls' high school. Hyphenated first names are often an indicator of problems such as Anne-Marie. Also 'regular' names with weird spellings. So K-Tee, Kaytee, K-T often spell trouble. Over here it is 'Chav' culture that causes this.

    On the other hand never had a bad Emily or Freya.
     
  17. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Jul 15, 2019 at 10:52 AM

    That's interesting! I've never even had a Freya in class lol but I have heard it used for cat names :rofl:
     

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