Quit rather than be non-renewed--what now?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Kenz501, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    What did you do in your internships if not work under a teacher who has taught for years? You said you had two.
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Do you mean to tell me between your bachelor's and master's programs you never once had to write a lesson plan? Also, you mean to tell me there was no one who could give you an example lesson plan so you know the format expected by the principal?
     
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  3. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    No, I didn't know what I needed to know, so the only way for me to find out would have been to ask for a step-by-step of everything, the whole process, so I could find out where I wasn't understanding. They weren't too picky about lesson plan format, but that open-ended-ness just left me confused.

    I signed up with vocational rehabilitation hoping they could help me figure out (a) what accommodations I need, and (b) how to effectively communicate those needs to my employers, as I'm not very good at that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  4. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    The answer is probably not looking for one at all.

    I get it. It's just a mindset thing, I guess. I don't want to put in the thousands of hours of searching, filling out applications, looking up companies, and trying to avoid scams that it takes to maybe, maybe find a legitimate job offer.

    It would be a lot easier if I could just call some place that's hiring and get them to give me the job. Those opportunities are hard to find, though, and the real job market is competitive. I'm not lying down and giving up, though. I just need to better organize my search so that I don't get discouraged.
     
  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    :beatdeadhorse:

    Like Nike says, “Just do it.”
     
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  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I think in addition to applying for various jobs, OP, you should also start learning how to write a lesson plan. Here are some links to get you started:





    Also, you should learn how to manage noisy and/or disruptive students:



    Pick the lesson plan template of your choice by Googling “lesson plan template”.

    Here is a tip that my advisor in my teaching credential program taught me: When you plan your lessons, keep a copy of the state standards and yearly overview and/or scope and sequence(s) nearby. DON’T start off my planning daily lessons, START by planning ENTIRE units. For example, in one unit last year in Geometry Honors, I had to teach students how to graphically and algebraically find the four points of concurrency (centroid, incenter, circumcenter, and orthocenter) for inscribed and circumscribed triangles with circles. In my lesson plans, I knew I had to allocate so many days to each topic and when my students should have their formal, summative assessments (that is, their mid-chapter quiz and end-of-unit test) and their formative assessments (informal, ongoing assessments that may or may not be graded). I also knew which days I would plan for reinforcement activities, group projects, and the like, which materials I would need, etc.

    This is sort of analogous to a MadLibs puzzle. You have the template (in accordance with the concepts students are expected to learn and master for each unit), and YOU as the teacher just have to fill in the blanks (lessons per unit).

    That is how lesson planning is made easy. FIRST, think of the big picture and THEN figure out how to get there. This will great simplify your job.

    No. More. Excuses. We know you didn’t learn how to make lesson plans, so it’s your job now to learn. That’s already been established. You are unemployed and have a lot of free time on your hands. Get to it.

    As teachers, our learning never stops — we are lifelong learners.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  7. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    If you stay in education, I would suggest with jobs that don't include classroom instruction. I think the best jobs would be for you are those that are repetitive, you learn once and they don't differ much after that - teaching is exactly the opposite.
    How about working for state - tests? Sich as proctoring tests (CSET, GRE, Praxis, etc), those jobs are pretty much the same thing. Or grading those tests.
    I have no clue where you would find those jobs, and how to apply, but I think you are qualified to do the and you would be be able to do them.
     
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  8. TrademarkTer

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    Kenz has made the decision that teaching is not for her, so none of this would be necessary. It'd be like saying that in addition to applying to various jobs, she should learn how to deliver local anesthetic or castrate a mule.
     
  9. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    Thanks. I plan to look at these.

    (um...how do I insert pictures?)

    It's not apparent from this screen shot, but this is what I was supposed to use to teach the kids--the teacher version, not the parent version. I only accessed this version because I no longer have access to the other version. This is what they never showed me how to use. I had to call the district to get help.

    Nope, I decided that teaching is not for me now. That isn't to say it will be off of the table forever. I am hoping to get help from vocational rehabilitation services, and I am hoping to figure out where my communication problems lie.

    I thought I explained already that I have had trouble with almost every job I've had; nothing has really worked, so far.
     
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  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Guru

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    OP, I think you do know that the way you see the world is not the way that others see it. You may never be able to see it the same way, no matter how hard you try, but you do realize that the "they wouldn't train me/teach me/tell me" concepts are not common in the forums you frequent. Most teacher graduates realize they have to figure out the path from a to b to c without a lot of hand holding. Have I received guidance over the years? Yes, and I have given guidance, but if I had to do my work and someone else's on a continual basis, I would soon pull away and isolate myself. It wouldn't be fair for admin to expect me to "train" a new teacher without end. Trust me, no one would be offering me a second salary to do the extra work, and my own classes would suffer because I was distracted by the extra duties. Perhaps this explains why you had so much trouble getting people to "train you." I am NOT, for one moment, saying that you don't need that kind of one on one help, only that my contract won't cover training the teacher who can't teach the classes assigned to them. Knowing what you do know now, that teaching is fast paced and requires constant adaptations to be successful, would you be able to train a new candidate who was unable to keep up with the curriculum or presentations? In other words, would you be willing to put your job on hold to train someone who gives the appearance of needing help forever? I'm just asking the questions because I don't think you have looked at this situation through the eyes of those you want to "train you.".

    As far as becoming a truck driver, well, I can envision you lost on a snow covered mountain somewhere, blaming the training for not being complete enough. I truly don't see this as a great choice. They expect these truck drivers to get from point A to point B is a set amount of time (or less), so any challenges, such as road closures, accidents, weather, would require quick changes to keep you successful. I'm with your dad on this one - don't get behind the wheel of a large truck.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  11. TrademarkTer

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    But you so quickly threw out fast food because it was too hard for you. Why is teaching easier than fast food? I find that insulting.
     
  12. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    Why is it insulting? Teaching is a more highly respected profession, and it isn't as fast-paced as fast food. Teachers aren't fast food workers, so they're not as expendable. The working conditions are way better for teachers than restaurant workers. There are health insurance benefits and free trainings. Principals aren't irresponsible kids, like some fast food managers and will actually work to train you if you don't catch on immediately. I'm sure there are other reasons that it is actually easier to keep a teaching job than a fast food job, but those are the examples I can think of.

    ...I'm still going to argue that I didn't need any more training than anyone else. I just didn't know how to ASK for what I needed, so they kept giving me things I didn't need! It was very frustrating, and I said that I agree that since I don't really know what my problems are, how to honestly evaluate my own performance, or how to ask for reasonable accommodations, I shouldn't even try it right now.

    ...but I also explained that it's not just teaching--it's pretty much every job I've ever taken. I thought I was doing badly at fast food jobs because they were unskilled work, and employers could afford to be harsh, but I've had similar problems in my "professional" jobs, too! There is something wrong, but if I were to take this problem, whatever it is, as an indication that I couldn't do the jobs, I would probably simply not be working.

    From what I know:
    I have trouble communicating my intentions non-verbally--non-verbal communication is the bulk of face-to-face communication. This causes all sorts of issues that I don't know how to deal with right now; at the youth center, I suspect it was part of why the students thought they could write so many complaints about me, and it might have been part of why my coworkers thought I wasn't interested in taking their advice.

    I'm very shy, and sometimes even scared, of people if the relationship isn't made clear. If my coworker is also my mentor, that should be made clear; otherwise, I won't know if her offers to help me are an invitation to be honest or be polite. I suspect this also got in the way. From my perspective, my coworkers weren't "safe" to ask for advice; I was looking for a designated person to ask.

    Hindsight, of course, is 20-20. I guess the best I can do is keep a record of this mistake so that if I'm ever in this situation again, I'll know what to do.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  13. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Fast food is different and not the easiest job. In some ways teaching is easier. I'd never survive on a fast assembly line where my fingers had to continually do the same thing or I had to continually and rapidly identify something that was defective and remove it. I'd say, for me, teaching would be easier because it doesn't require the same skills.
     
  14. TrademarkTer

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    We're talking about someone who needs repetition, training, and step-by-step instructions here----fast food more clearly fits that bill.
     
  15. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    No. We are talking about someone who needs a slower paced job that is consistent and can be done in a step-by-step manner with little deviation or creative thinking.

    Fast paced can stop certain people in their tracks and make them freeze up. It doesn't matter if the person can be taught step-by-step how to build that hamburger, if the pressure is on, the rest doesn't matter a bit.

    Fast food is a stressful environment, especially at busy times. It needs someone who can work under pressure. It isn't stressful when patrons drip in a few at a time, but during the rush, it is a job like few others, especially at places that are known for their fast service. McDonald's used to have to give refunds if the order didn't come out in a certain amount of time.
     
  16. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Do you see the icons in the edit box. Move your cursor over them and you will see what each is for. Click on it and it will tell you what you need to do and the types of information it is used to embed. You can cancel if it is the wrong icon.
     
  17. vickilyn

    vickilyn Guru

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    I'm pretty sure that OP has indicated that the fast food or assembly line work would not be suitable. OP also would struggle with decisions that had to be made rapidly (think find the defective part as the assembly line keeps rolling on at a "not slow" pace). We all have skill sets, but that wouldn't be in mine, to be sure. I can deal with rapidly changing student behaviors, but I can't make my fingers or eyes work fast enough to work on an assembly line. My dad worked for GM, and he was a repair man. I asked how new cars could need repairs, and he said that when someone was having a problem, they would just do any old thing, whether it was correct or not, when the assembly line rolled past them. It would make you never want to buy a new car if I told you some of the things he had to "repair" before they could leave the plant. Kudos to GM for knowing they needed repair personnel.
     
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  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Guru

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    OP, you see it your way if that makes you feel better, but most people can finish their Master's degree and get a teaching job without needing explicit "training" once on the job. If you struggle with non-verbal communication, why not ask who your mentor is/was? Also, why not ask how much they expect you to be able to do on your own? I entered teaching through the AR program, and I can tell you that learning the majority of it on your own is the difference of becoming certified or not. I respectfully disagree that you don't need more training than most. Many ASD workers have a one to one aid for an unspecified amount of time to learn the job. That is not the norm for your average new teacher.
     
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  19. Kenz501

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    Have you ever worked at a McDonald's? I did when I was still in high school. It was one of the worst jobs ever. Everything happened so fast that I couldn't keep up. My coworkers made fun of me and distracted me. I definitely complained that they "didn't train me" well enough, and...the manager didn't really care to even try to figure out what was wrong and why I was performing so poorly...they just fired me. It wasn't a big deal. I didn't really need the job at the time. I just wanted to have one, because it was something teenagers could do, and I wanted to be independent.

    What was a pretty big deal was when the same, or maybe something worse, happened to me at the job I took at that diner after Katrina. I was nearly homeless and got the job on a sob story. It was fast food, too, though, and I had a lot of trouble keeping up. It was loud and busy, the kitchen staff complained that I didn't always call the orders I took (it was really loud in the restaurant, maybe they just didn't hear me?). The cook and customers sometimes made fun of me. I forgot some of the procedures they went over. I was never able to keep track of all of the tickets (I don't know why; I suspect maybe a few customers were walking out without paying while I was busy doing something else; we had a lot of duties--it's also possible that others bused my tables while I was occupied washing dishes or serving other customers), and of course, I was eventually fired from that job, too, but not only that--they wrote that they fired me because they either caught me stealing or suspected me of stealing. Needless to say, that was NOT a pleasant experience. I'm lucky I didn't end up having to fight a court case or something. This was right before I started attending college, so that could have really hurt me.

    That's why I'm really thinking that it's okay to be a little picky, even in times of desperation, not being that way can cost you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  20. vickilyn

    vickilyn Guru

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    Diagnosing ASD in adults is often more difficult than diagnosing ASD in children. In adults, some ASD symptoms can overlap with symptoms of other mental-health disorders, such as anxiety or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

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