Quit rather than be non-renewed--what now?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Kenz501, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Feb 9, 2019

    Hint: don't take a job you don't know how to do, especially when children will be shortchanged.
     
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  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    I disagree. I think it is because you spent too much time blaming everyone else which you are still doing to a large extent.

    Why don't you ask vocational rehab if you could get therapy through a speech pathologist to help with communication skills and social skills if they are needed?
     
  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Bad, bad idea. Being a special education teacher working with those who don't communicate well need people who are exceptional at communication and divergent thinking in order to figure out what the person with the disability means.
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Did they do testing to determine based on your disability what jobs would be suitable for you?
     
  5. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I wouldn't mind trying private schools, I guess. It really looks like my options around here are limited, though. If I want to stick to teaching, I should probably try online. I just don't want to mess up the interview. I hate it when I get to the interview stage of applying for a job and then mess it up. That may be why I look for jobs that don't really require a face-to-face interview. Those are easier to get and keep.

    That depends. I could teach special education in a team teaching setting, as I've done so with ESL students. I could also work with kids who have high-functioning autism, under certain circumstances.

    The problem I have with teaching is related less to effective communication and more to lack of proper organization and preparation. Yes, to effectively teach anyone anything, I need to get this problem sorted, and, since I don't currently know how, teaching is off the table, except in a collaborative setting.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
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  6. Always__Learning

    Always__Learning Comrade

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    Feb 9, 2019

    If you need a job now, have you tried fast food outlets? Many fast food organizations are open to hiring people with disabilities and you would get information about exactly what you were supposed to do.

    This would also let you 'leave work at work.' If your goal is to work in education, that might give you enough time to do some volunteering to build your experience so you could eventually do well enough in an interview/ be independent enough to get a job. Basically, to get a job in education you have to be ready to do it now. It can't be a situation where you need a whole bunch of support. I suspect you might be a person who needs substantially longer than the time of a degree to be ready, so volunteering could be a way to bridge that gap. In the meantime, you could help pay some of the bills in your household.
     
  7. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I wouldn't mind at this point, but I'm also a pretty bad fast food employee---why? It's too stressful and fast-paced. When I try to work in these kinds of environments, I get really stressed and forget what I'm doing. Plus, I don't handle embarrassment, bullying, or certain forms of criticism well and have only lasted a few months as a fast food employee in the past. If you want to talk about jobs that are a terrible fit for me, most fast food jobs are.

    That said, though, I did try to apply as a barista at the local Starbucks. No one's called me about it yet, so I'm assuming I didn't get the job.
     
  8. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Why did you leave that job?
     
  9. Unetheladyteacher

    Unetheladyteacher Rookie

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    Feb 9, 2019

    My point is that it takes a while to get comfortable accepting help from others. Teaching is about knowing when to ask for help and knowing when you are expected to be the expert. As for expecting others to read your mind, a very wise person once told me that people shouldn't have to come to you all the time. You have to come to them sometimes. Doing so might make you grumpy and it might feel weird at first, but it really pays off. Have you also tried finding ways to enhance your communication skills or find a job that more closely meets your skill set? Teaching is not for you if you cannot find a way to make communication work for you.

    Having a person to talk to about this might also help. You may think what you are saying is easy to understand, but it is always good to have someone else tell you how they feel about what you say.
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Boy, you just nailed the issues that OP has posted about profusely. Best, or worst, part is that you lived with someone who displayed all of these same ways of "wanting help" but NOT wanting help in the same breath as OP. Even if OP had listened when it was pointed out that resigning would block receiving unemployment payments, that is a short term fix, in the long run, lasting a limited number of months, not years. If OP gets disability benefits from Social Security, it will almost certainly not be considered a living wage, equivalent to the income from being employed.

    OP, if you have family to take you in who understand your problems, this may be the time to swallow your pride and go that route. It is not the time to blame all public schools because you didn't work out in the jobs they offered. If I remember correctly, you also didn't work out when teaching at the detention center. I also don't think that avoiding face to face interviews is a smart strategy - you may feel like you will get the job, but the employer may very well feel that they were duped, and you were deceptive. That's a terrible way for the school to find out just how much help you really need/want/require to do the job that someone else could do with a minimum of extra help or additional training.

    If I was you, I would be on the phone constantly trying to get vocational training. If they refuse to help, find out why. Make sure your diagnosis of ASD is confirmed by a specialist who deals with these disorders, so that the diagnosis is not questioned. You will need all the documentation you can get.

    Please, don't go into SPED - you need to be able to think on your feet and adapt to changing conditions. Additionally, you would almost certainly need more grad school, which I am certain would stress you out even more. Some people on this forum teach ESL online to children in China. I have no idea what the pay is, or if you would be able to do the work, but maybe you need to explore something like that. Best of luck.
     
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  11. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    The program closed. It was only part-time.

    That's why I should probably avoid it. I don't try to be, but I'm sort of thin skinned. It's easy to get to me, and I'm naturally distrustful of certain personalities.

    I'm sure there's a reason why the interview is part of the process to begin with. I thought about VIP Kid, but that requires a whole demonstration video. That would require a lot of acting, and I've been putting it off, because I don't want to mess up a good opportunity by blowing the interview. I'm terrible at cold interviewing, but videos can be edited and tweaked. I guess I could sit down with a friend one day and make a convincing one.

    I think my big concern with face-to-face interviews is my appearance. I'm not really sure what it is, but it seems like I only tend to get the job when I'm recommended by someone the employer knows...
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  12. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    No matter how much training, experience and support someone has, teaching is fast-paced and stressful. Working with others and communicating effectively are an essential part of the job. I understand that you have invested a lot of time and money in this career, but I'm hoping that you'll be able to find something more suited to your personality and strengths.
     
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  13. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    My EX did well (from outside points of view) with his factory job. They showed him exactly what to do, and that is ALL he did all day long. He worked there a few months, and then they asked him to train for a second task and train others for his job. That's where he hit panic mode. He quit, claiming that everyone made fun of him and nobody was willing to help him.

    Perhaps you need a job where you have limited, repetitive tasks.
     
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  14. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    For a survival job? I would gladly take something like that. As long as it's not too fast-paced, I would be fine. The slower afternoon shift at a restaurant, a job tutoring a small group of well-adjusted kids, a position as a co-teacher, a job slowly assembling parts on an assembly line, etc. are all jobs I could do fairly well. It just gets harder when too much unpredictability or speed gets thrown into the equation. At some point, I just "shut down" and "panic" and have trouble thinking about the task.

    Well, considering I can't even keep up with repetitive little fast food type jobs that are fast-paced and high-stress, I guess that's something to consider. I know it requires a lot of organization and such to do the job well, but the thing no one ever told me was that nowhere in teacher training or on the job do they teach you how to do it. You're kind of just left to figure it out on your own, and for me, that's a no-go. I need clear, structured, nearly step-by-step instructions to feel comfortable completing a semi-complicated task, but it's difficult for me to wrap my mind around the concept that everyone isn't like me and they just "magically" know what to do. I think it makes more sense that they were taught what they know, at one point or another.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  15. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Feb 9, 2019

    It is my understanding that the employment office may let you know about jobs that are open that may fit your qualifications, but it it up to you to get and do the interview.
     
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  16. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    You may choose to believe that they were taught what they know simply because your own mind can't conceive of a world where people make connections intuitively based on their education. For you, your education was viewed as a how to manual, but that's not how most people utilize their education. Education is the road map, but you have to know how to connect the dots. I'm not sure that is something that you can learn, and I am addressing OP. Certainly trying to use the education that you paid for has not been successful for you, so there is something wrong in "connecting the dots". You can write, so maybe that is something you should look into. Not sure in what capacity it would work, but maybe there is something I am missing.
     
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  17. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Our temp agencies point you to their website and say, good luck.

    Now, there is job training for the poor if they qualify but that is under a different umbrella.
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    You are absolutely correct. Any one looking for a job can seek out employment at the same place where you would go to draw unemployment benefits. Although OP is not eligible for money from unemployment benefits, any person looking for a job can view postings for workers wanted at the unemployment office that services you. Businesses like to post there, since it cuts down on the costs of running ads in newspapers that many people no longer receive. It would certainly be worth a look.
     
  19. Kenz501

    Kenz501 Cohort

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    I see the world the way I see it, and if that's not everyone else's perception, I guess I'll never know.

    Yes, I've been trying the employment office. I was informed that a lot of people looking for work also use websites like indeed.com. I did manage to find my freelancing job by simply scouring websites and blogs, so maybe it's worth a shot. I could probably find a good job if I just committed to the search. I usually have other things to do during the day, though, and can't spend the whole day job hunting.

    Another idea would be to just go where the jobs seem to be. For example, there are some truck driving schools that pay their students to train with them in exchange for accepting a contract upon completion of the training. I thought about going that route, but so far all I've found is CDL training, and my dad hates the idea of me getting behind the wheel of a truck, even though they would train me six months and pay me while doing so. I'm walking away from what seems like an almost "too good to be true" opportunity because I have been advised against it, but after failing that teaching job, I don't really trust a lot of things anyway. I wouldn't want to wind up stranded on a snowy mountain or something, after all.

    These "pay to train" opportunities do sound good, though, so maybe I'll look and see if I can find more in other fields. I have options. I'm just getting stressed because I'm starting to actually need the money I make. People sometimes complain about teacher's salaries, but for a single person with few major expenses, it was actually a pretty good income.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  20. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Feb 9, 2019

    How about a job at a museum, library, or book store? Administrative assistant? Post office worker?
     

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