Organizing Supplies On The First Day

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by iteachbx, Sep 7, 2013.

  1. time out

    time out Comrade

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    Jul 19, 2014

    I used to do the grocery paper bags for individual student supplies but last year I did something different and I LOVED it.

    We have parent orientation before the first day of school and I highly encourage parents to bring in school supplies in my welcome to first grade letter mail out.

    At the orientation, I have copy boxes labeled with names of my community supplies such as glue sticks, pencils, etc. Then on each student's desk, I have a checklist of the supplies that need to go in their desks such as scissors, pencil boxes, etc.

    With this method, everything is already sorted and I don't have to spend hours organizing their supplies.
     
  2. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jul 19, 2014

    I will be lucky if half of my students bring ANY supplies. Couple that with the fact that the district office neglected to update our (10 year old) school's supply lists on their Master List (which they send to all retailers, etc., and which parents access online), and I end up purchasing enough supplies so that all of my students have everything they need. Pencils, highlighters, glue (of any kind), looseleaf paper, construction paper, sticky notes, copy paper, etc., are all community property and stored accordingly. All "desk items" (composition books, work folders, binders, etc.) are labeled with the child's name and number and stored in their desks. In my experience, kids played with glue and scissors when those items were kept in their desks, so now I keep them, and we pass them out when needed. Each student has a pencil pouch (I supply), a box of 24 crayons (I also supply), and on their desks will be a "welcome to 3rd grade" and a regular pencil, both sharpened, along with a large red eraser. Students turn in pencils for sharpening at the end of each day, and each morning, they get 2 sharp pencils to begin with, swapping them as needed during the day. NO students have pencil sharpeners. Color pencils are community property (I usually supply those, as well as any markers).

    I like the idea of the brown paper bags! Usually, I have boxes set up, and have the kiddos bring me their supplies one at a time. At that time, I send spiral notebooks and ink pens home for practice, sort the supplies into the appropriate boxes, and check off the supplies on a spreadsheet I have in Excel. I can send reminders home, but they are not often effective.

    Wow, I wrote a book! Sorry for the novel!
     
  3. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jul 19, 2014

    Does anyone have a sample letter that they'd be willing to share for reminding families to send in supplies?
     
  4. missalli

    missalli Companion

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    Jul 19, 2014

    I'll be teaching a self-contained classroom for the first time in 6 years and this is the sort of stuff that makes me think "Yikes!" I won't be finding out who my students are until a couple days before school starts, which makes it hard to communicate with parents beforehand. I also work in a high-poverty/Title I school so I'm not expecting much. I do know that I will be buying each student a pencil pouch and maintaining a bucket for each group with community supplies - art stuff, highlighters, scissors, glue, etc. Any crayons, colored pencils, markers, etc that students bring will be labeled with their number and go in the appropriate bucket. I don't think we're allowed to 'require' students to bring in specific items, but I don't think there's anything against requesting or asking for donations. I'll definitely be asking for donations of Kleenex, Clorox wipes and the like.
     

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