Kindly specify any tool which can help my kids to learn ABC and counting?

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by michaelcarric, Jun 8, 2015.

  1. michaelcarric

    michaelcarric New Member

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    Jun 8, 2015

    anything which can be used to teach my kids ABC and math Counting....
     
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  3. justwanttoteach

    justwanttoteach Cohort

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  4. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Jun 18, 2015

    What about uno for colors & numbers. I used to play skip Bo counts up to 12 & backwards from 12.

    Summer is a fun time to do shaving cream letters & then run through sprinkler!!!

    Don't forget sidewalk chalk!!!
     
  5. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Habitué

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    Jun 25, 2015

    Calendar time helps a lot with counting. We also count a lot together ("let's count how many friends are here today!" or "how many squares do you see on the circle time carpet?", etc)

    As for the alphabet, we did a letter of the week and discussed words that started with that letter or I'd read a short sentence and ask them which words started with that letter.

    I'm surprised Kindergartners don't know their letters and counting. They usually learn this stuff when they're 2-3 years old. I taught Pre-K and they knew all their letters & numbers. They could count past 100 by graduation time and I had a few already reading.
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Jun 26, 2015

    Read to them, call out license plate numbers and letters, beginning letters of words they will know (M is for McDonalds, T and the B for Taco Bell, W for Walmart, etc.) let them help you count the eggs in the carton, or the cookies in the package, or the shoes on the deck, etc. Make it fun, incorporate it into everyday life, and they will grasp the significance.
     
  7. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Jun 26, 2015

    It's amazing how many kiddos come to Kindergartner & don't have any concept of what letters or numbers are. I've had some come to school and could only count to 3 and don't recognize their own name.

    These kids are already behind.
     
    txmomteacher2 likes this.
  8. Andreawhite

    Andreawhite New Member

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    Jul 23, 2015

    You can check this resource site

    check this website - kidseclass This has lot of free games and interactives. All the best.
     
  9. Miss Kinders

    Miss Kinders Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2015

    Like mentioned, Starfall.com is fantastic. Here is a categorized list of resources and playlists. We all learn better with music. Click on the phonics list or an individual letter, then click "View complete LETTER A playlist," for example. https://www.pinterest.com/misskinders/
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Virtuoso

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    Oct 11, 2015

    I would like to share something that I learned as a mom - any time you are engaged with a child, not talking down, not barking orders, but in harmony with the child, you will not need games, although they are always welcome. When my son was young, he had speaking delays, but his receptive skills were normal. He helped me go around the house, as I explained that sometimes mom needed to think how to spell something that I used everyday. With post-it notes and pen in hand we wound through the house, questioning what various items sounded like, especially that very first sound/letter. So on the door, we had a post-it with a "D" on it. We made one of these tags for every door in the house. We counted the doors, we listened for other "D" words, which included the dog, dirty shoes (eventually became D S), down, donut (we ate the evidence, which allowed us to throw away the tag), and the list goes on. You may find it hard to engage children unless you try to see life through their eyes, their experiences. Count everything - and I mean everything. It will take you more time than putting them in front of a game or video, but the learning is more organic, of importance to the child. My son was all about music from an early age, and we listened to all kinds, and I would tell him what instrument was playing, about key changes, and on the list went. If he had been interested in math away from music, I would have gone down that road with him, as well. Talk to them when they are captive in the car seat or seat of the shopping cart, and encourage them to find colors, shapes, groupings that they know or are learning about. Last time I went on a car trip where no one wanted to say my name or share things with me, I felt I was being punished. Kids know some odd things, and they will surprise you with them. Remember, it isn't a test, a lot of answers will be wrong in the beginning, but it is how we grow and learn. I honestly think that parents make great teachers, and I can always tell which children had parents who fostered creativity and wonder.
     
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  11. scholarteacher

    scholarteacher Connoisseur

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    Oct 22, 2015

  12. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Aficionado

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    Oct 22, 2015

    abcmouse.com is good also
     
  13. Immerito

    Immerito Rookie

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    Oct 27, 2015

    Tape a piece of paper with traceable letters for each student on the underside of tables or desk. Have the students lie down on the floor on their backs to trace their letters with a pencil.
     
  14. SCTeacher23

    SCTeacher23 Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2015

    I use a variety of activities but what has helped my group a lot has been You Tube videos. I will play alphabet videos everyday at random times during the day such as during pack up or if we have a few extra minutes between subjects. For counting, I will have kids count orally everyday during transitions. For example, while the kid are getting up from their desks and going to the carpet, I will have one child be the counting leader and they will say each number and the other children will have to repeat after them.
     
  15. Jessie Feliz

    Jessie Feliz New Member

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    Apr 17, 2016

    Greetings! I just uploaded my Alphabet n Animals Song that comes with a toolkit for teaching and reinforcing the alphabet and spelling. In YouTube you can search "alphabet n animals" and its the third video that comes up under the Channel Name: Magia Escolar and in the comment section you will find the link for the toolkit that goes with the song.

    Works great for kindergarten, preschool and daycare programs, as well as homeschooling. I use it with my toddler and she is already recognizing the animals and letters.
     
  16. suzy7677

    suzy7677 Rookie

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    Dec 7, 2017 at 12:48 AM

    Alphabet soup, worked magic. I had an ELL learner who for the first 3 months of school could not Id the first letter/sound in his name then I brought out the soup. So you can make your own tubs and fill with letters and words/items that begin with that letter. It has been a life saver.
     
  17. Obadiah

    Obadiah Habitué

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    Dec 7, 2017 at 7:12 AM

    Upon arriving here, I noticed this is an older post, but I think it certainly still has current relevance. In agreement with the above, I have a few other tips that might be helpful. In the classroom, I would recommend time(s) during the day in which the students are experiencing music, especially orderly forms of music such as classical, nursery rhymes, standard classroom songs such as Hap Palmer. Not that modern music should be avoided, but the orderly forms of music will build up brain connections related to the orderly progression of the alphabet, numbers, calculation, and the orderly arrangement of letters in words and sentences. I would enrich the classroom with the many varieties of alphabet, counting, and arithmetic books currently available. In agreement with the above alphabet soup idea, Post Alphabets might be a beneficial snack, not just in recognizing letters, but in reconstructing brain connections to recognize different versions of the same letters; in other words, a letter written on the board or paper is not precisely the same shape as a cereal (or soup) form of the same letter, not that this needs to be specifically pointed out by the teacher, but the more exposure to various forms, the more the brain will automatically reconfigure to accept other shapes. Children learn through play, laughing, exploring, experimenting, making and adjusting for mistakes, and observing. Ideally, their brain is in high gear at all times, so the more opportunity for such, the better. I would label everything in the classroom, and the more the students participate in the labeling the better, even if the best that can be done at that stage is asking a student to tape a teacher made label in the appropriate location. Rhymes are especially appropriate at this age, and libraries contain many such rhymes. I'm thinking of the old standard
    1, 2, buckle my shoe./ 3, 4, shut the door./ 5, 6 pick up sticks./ 7, 8 lay them straight./ 9, 10 start all over again....but a class (or teacher) can start from this pattern and create their own rhyme. Example: 1,2,3, what do I see? 4,5,6, six baby chicks. 7,8,9, they look so fine. Another activity is for a "monster" (perhaps a funny puppet) to secretly invade the classroom overnight and mix up some of the labels. The class can try to put the labels back in their appropriate places and even teach the monster puppet why the label belongs where it does. Students can spell words by standing in line, each holding a blank laminated poster board. Each student writes her/his letter on the board s/he is holding. By standing in line, they spell the word. If DVD's are available of the older Electric Company, segments of that might be quite helpful as students advance. One last quick story that might invoke further ideas, I had one Kindergarten student in a 1-room-schoolhouse type situation, whose breakthrough came from spelling the word "ox". He lay on his back on the floor, formed an "o" with his arms and an "x" with his legs.
     
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