I need to change careers

Discussion in 'General Education' started by teaching-is-hell, Jan 7, 2019.

  1. teaching-is-hell

    teaching-is-hell Rookie

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    Jan 7, 2019

    I have been miserable teaching for 5 years now but my young family situation has kept me in it. I am 40 and I know that I must make a jump soon. I need to make 75K.

    I really dont want to spend tons of time getting another degree. What can I do? What kinds of companies will hire an ex teacher? I feel like there are professions out there that I'm not really thinking of.

    I do not want to do sales.

    Also, how do I go about trying to find something? Contact recruiting staffs? Just posting my resume out there on LinkedIn, Indeed, etc? I'd love it if someone came and found me!

    Thanks.
     
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  3. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    Jan 8, 2019

    The first thing that comes to mind is working as a corporate trainer.
     
  4. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Jan 8, 2019

    Have you considered becoming an administrator? And why the 75k figure, if you don’t me asking? And how much do you make now?

    The reason I’m asking is because an employer will sometimes inquire about your previous salary to try and assess your “worth/cost” to the company because if they can get away with paying you less, then they oftentimes will try and do that. However, it can sometimes be a good thing because I’ve known people who made, say $90,000, at their pevious job and so they asked for slightly higher than that when they interviewed elsewhere.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
  5. cupcakequeen

    cupcakequeen Comrade

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    Jan 8, 2019

    Of the teachers I know that have left the field,

    -One opened her own art studio aimed at kids
    -One became a trainer for Wilson Reading Programs
    -One opened an organic co-op
    -One supervises student teachers at a local university, but I think he considers himself semi-retired and probably doesn't make a lot doing this.
    -One is a trainer for an "Educational Solutions" program- basically, he teaches school districts how to implement PBIS, or RTI...things like that.
    -One is a curriculum designer for...Pearson, maybe? Some major textbook company.
    -One works at our local bank as a teller, but has worked his way up to being some sort of supervisor
    -One does freelance graphic design
    -And one got sucked into MLMs- definitely don't recommend that route.

    I think there are a lot of options for former teachers, but a lot of it depends on your skill set and interests. I just listed the above to give you an idea of how varied it can be, though I have no idea what these people make. I'd be willing to bet the PBIS trainer makes BIG bucks, just based on my casual acquaintanceship with him through social media. The freelance graphic designer seems to be doing really well too, but again, I'm just speculating.

    What other hobbies/talents/skills do you have?
     
    readingrules12 likes this.
  6. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Jan 8, 2019

  7. 3Sons

    3Sons Connoisseur

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    Jan 10, 2019


    What do you teach? Depending what it is, that might guide your career opportunities. I imagine it's not math or computers, since if they were those you probably wouldn't be asking for such general advice. However, if it's English that could also be useful in a number of fields.

    People aren't likely to come find you, even for roles in which you could do well. For people to be hunting you down, you generally need to have specific experience that they're targeting.

    There are a number of certifications you could get which might also boost your chances. These involve a few months of study but can be helpful in transitioning.

    How soon do you need to make 75k? Also, why? (If it's a mortgage, then moving isn't part of the solution, right?)
     
  8. PinAlan

    PinAlan New Member

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    Jan 10, 2019

    "People aren't likely to come find you, even for roles in which you could do well. For people to be hunting you down, you generally need to have specific experience that they're targeting."

    Words of wisdom, right there. :)
     
  9. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jan 10, 2019

    People who are miserable in the teaching profession should not become administrators. Period.
     
  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Yes and no. Some people don’t like teaching and flourish as admin. I know admin who were prior teachers and did not like their job and felt administration was their true calling.
     
  11. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Jan 11, 2019

    This just doesn't make sense to me. They hated teaching, but felt they could lead teachers, guide students, help parents, and run an entire school? C'mon, even you know that doesn't add up.
     
  12. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I agree. An effective administrator recognizes and appreciates what happens in the classroom every day. They understand the challenges of teaching and are able to provide support and guidance to staff, students and parents when it is required. The most common complaint I have heard about ineffective administrators is that they don't remember what it's like to be on the front lines of education.
     
  13. pommom

    pommom Comrade

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    Jan 11, 2019

    I am an ex teacher currently looking for nonteaching professions. Remember to update your resume and not have it "scream" teacher. That was my problem in the beginning; I was only looked at as a teacher. On my resume I took out my certifications. I listed my administrative skills and added odd jobs I did before teaching. I finally started getting interviews after I made that change.
     
  14. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    I don’t really see why that is so perplexing. There are plenty of people who don’t like a certain job, but still want to work in the same field as a leader. That is a common thing.
     
  15. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    One of my current VP’s did not like being a teacher, but now he loves working as an administrator. He wanted to be involved with education as a director and not an educator.

    Another friend of mine wanted to get out teaching because she says “there’s no money in it” and so she got her EdD and then got hired by the state department of education. Now, she’s much happier and makes learning modules for various curricula and earns over $250,000/year.
     
  16. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Administrators are educators. We educate both teachers and parents (I provide PD for teachers and also lead parent education classes). Additionally, we (administrators) educate students by guiding and mentoring them. Finally, administrators are educators because we’re role models.
     
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  17. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Fanatic

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    Fair enough, I mean educator in a traditional sense.
     
  18. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jan 12, 2019

    LOL I've worked with some admin who couldn't do any of those things either.
    And some admin don't even have ANY educational background at all. That's really perplexing. These are the ones who really have no clue what it means to be an educator.
    :(
     
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  19. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Jan 12, 2019

    Yes because there are some people that are teachers who really don't like the job or seem to enjoy working with kids. The further up the ladder you move, the further away from the kids you get. So you may enjoy "teaching'' adults and occasionally interacting with students, but your #1 job ISN'T direct contact with kids anymore. I've worked with academic coaches (who are on the admin team) who clearly didn't enjoy being around children. It was obvious when they were in my room modeling lessons for me.
    It all goes back to some people really just want the TITLE, not the job.
    I've met and worked with a lot of those people. They want to be able to call themselves "teachers'' so they can get the accolades. "OMG, you're a teacher! You're a hero. Thank you for the work that you do.''
    (gag)
     
  20. JimG

    JimG Companion

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    Jan 12, 2019

    1. Why are you miserable, and to what degree can you control or manage those factors that make you miserable? Are there aspects that would still show up and make you miserable once you find greener grass?

    2. Transitioning to a brand new career path without extensive education or certification geared toward that career path, I find it hard to believe a $75k entry-level salary would be easy to find. If it is a dire financial situation, maybe there are ways you could supplement your teaching income.

    3. If you do decide to make a change, you need to make yourself marketable to people you want to work for. That might mean learning an entirely new skill set, which takes time, committment, and likely money.
     
  21. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Jan 12, 2019

    An effective school administrator does interact with the students every day; they need to be visible in hallways, classrooms and on the playground. Their door needs to be open for all of the students, not just those in trouble. It needs to be evident that they care about all aspects of the school community; that's how they are able to be effective leaders for everyone.

    I've worked for many administrators during my career; the best were rarely in their office, the worst never left it.
     

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