How to manage informational writing when discussion takes place on carpet?

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by karypal, Sep 23, 2017.

  1. karypal

    karypal Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2017

    I am a student teacher in a first grade class who has taken over the writing portion of the day. The students have been working on informational writing and they begin their lesson with a discussion on the carpet about what they are writing about. After discussion, ideas, examples, etc. students are dismissed to their desks where they write their sentence. Before, students have only been writing one sentence per day.
    I want to try having them to two sentences a day, but wonder how I should have the lesson proceed.
    Should I:
    A) Go over both sentences on the carpet and then dismiss to their desks
    OR
    B) Go over 1 sentence, have them write it at their desks; then regroup at carper to discuss second sentence and send them back to their desk? (This seems problematic as some students are faster/slower).
    Any help would be appreciated!
     
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  3. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Sep 23, 2017

    What are your cooperating teacher's thoughts? Unless she is incompetent, you should get her perspective. Then I'd say to post here for feedback on that perspective.
     
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  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Sep 23, 2017

    I agree. She is there to be your mentor, so your shouldn't be afraid to ask her. She knows the curriculum, and she knows the students. Ask her what she thinks is best.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 23, 2017

    They should be writing as much as they can. Don't limit to one or two sentences.

    Your mini lessons could be about structure.."let me show you how this author wrote a step by step how to on the topic". "Let's try that, turn and talk". "Go write a step by step".
    Other mini lessons could be matching pictures/diagrams with words, compare and contrast, different kinds of...etc.
     
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  6. karypal

    karypal Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2017

    Hi there, I fully plan on asking my mentor teacher on Monday. However, I'm doing some preliminary planning for the up and coming weeks and just wondered how it is managed as I've not yet seen this in the classroom.
    Thanks for your response!
     
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  7. sharun

    sharun New Member

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    Oct 23, 2017

    I did few information report writing on animals with my class last term. I always begin my lesson as whole class activity on the floor. To start off the report writing, we carried on with the research using ICT. All the students were involved in this activity. While doing the research students had an information report template to fill up with the information that could be used in their writing. These information were also listed down on the board as well. Students had to later use this information to write few sentences to build on their report writing. It is good idea to use template for information report writing as it guides students when they are involve in report writing.
     
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  8. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Oct 23, 2017

    I like how you are thinking ahead, searching for ideas and then discussing with your cooperating teacher, and how you are looking at the lesson from a student's perspective. For your lesson, I would recommend discussing samples in your mini-lesson, especially allowing for the students to critique and suggest ideas for the best sentence structure or to explain what they liked about the sample sentence(s). I agree with czacza, it might be best to not limit the number of sentences, if they are currently able to write sentences. It's a tricky phenomenon of mini-lessons: sometimes they can be too detailed and sometimes they can be too loose. Too detailed, and you get mechanical reproductions of the lessons or some students who can't seem to fit in their thinking (which is still proper) with the specifications. Too little information, and the students don't have a clue what to do.
     

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