How much time off in summer?

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Ima Teacher, May 6, 2019.

  1. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    May 7, 2019

    I don't work in the summer but our contracts are for one full year.
     
  2. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    May 8, 2019

    This is why we do our PD for next year at the end of the school year. That way we have all summer to work on the right stuff.
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    May 8, 2019

    How does that work for new teachers? Do they do it all again for them at the beginning of the next school year? That just seems like an odd set up to me.
     
  4. MntnHiker

    MntnHiker Rookie

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    May 8, 2019

    I get about ten weeks off. I don't do any work or PD in the summer. We have two PD days before the students come back, and I get my room ready in those two days. I relish my summers off; it is a perk of the job and I don't feel guilty about taking that time and enjoying it.
     
  5. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    May 8, 2019

    We generally hire before the school year ends, so they can attend summer PD. When they are hired later, we have to fill them in on things through our PLC work. We don’t have a lot of turnover, so it isn’t usually a problem.
     
  6. whizkid

    whizkid Comrade

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    May 9, 2019

    What type of training is that? That really caught my attention.
     
  7. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    May 11, 2019

    Arkansas has an initiative called RISE that focuses on the science of teaching reading. All elementary certified teachers are required to receive training and demonstrate profiency to keep their licenses. There are multiple pathways to show profiency, and it is up to each district to determine how to help their teachers meet the requirements. There is a large section devoted to RISE on the state department of education webpage if you’d like more information.
     
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  8. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    May 11, 2019

    This is smart. Our district likes to spring this stuff on us when we have kids coming in the very next day.
     

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