CSET English Subtest 3 Emergency Help

Discussion in 'Single Subject Tests' started by jeremytgarcia, Mar 25, 2018.

  1. jeremytgarcia

    jeremytgarcia New Member

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    Mar 25, 2018

    Hi all,

    I've taken this test three times now and I keep coming up with an identical score. I get "S, D" on the first essay and "K, D" on the second. I know what the scores mean in basic terms, but I don't know how to correct them. I even looked up the readings after the test the second time as additional practice, only to find they used the SAME readings the third time! I thought I had it in the bag, but I got the same score!

    I take the test again in a couple days and I could really use some help here. Does anyone have tips and tricks? Sage advice?

    Any help is greatly appreciated!
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Mar 26, 2018

    On CSET constructed responses, a diagnostic of s in the absence of the diagnostic p generally means that the analysis is on the right track but that it isn't well supported. In the case of CSET English III tasks, s can result when the analysis isn't backed up by enough evidence from the text(s) one is analyzing, or when the conclusion is reasonably correct but the premises on which it is based are not. Claiming tone as one point of similarity between a given poem and a given short story commits the test taker to provide evidence from the texts - words, phrases, sentences - that are similar in tone. If no evidence is cited, or if the evidence cited doesn't really reflect tone, or if similarities exist but tone isn't one of them, then s is a likely diagnostic.

    A diagnostic of k in the absence of p generally means that the analysis is on the right track but the test taker's understanding is insufficient. A discussion of a nonliterary text in which "rhetoric" is used as a synonym for "bombast" is likely to get a k; so is a discussion in which a key type of clause or part of speech is consistently misidentified.
     

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