Career after resignation

Discussion in 'Forum Announcements & FAQ' started by Coloteacher, May 19, 2017.

  1. Coloteacher

    Coloteacher Rookie

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    May 19, 2017

    I was asked to resign as they decided not to renew my contract. This was my first year of teaching and I resigned in March hoping that I will get another job by end of school year. I had a terrible year of teaching and at times I feel I shouldn't go back to teaching. But I want to give it one more try before quitting. May be middle school was too much , so high school or elementary this time. I applied everywhere in the same district but have not been called for an interview so far. Is it because of my resignation that the same district won't rehire me? I'm starting to get worried now. Shall I go back to subbing ? Or paraprofessional? I have MS in science and Masters in education.Please advice me. I will be grateful for your suggestions. Thanks.
     
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  3. AmyMyNamey

    AmyMyNamey Comrade

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    Oct 7, 2017

    This all depends upon where you are and the demand for teachers. You certainly will not get another job in the same district—don't even try. Resigning does not mean the end of a career in most places, but for a few states that are flush with teacher candidates. You can go to another town, another district, and get another job. The demand for teachers in your area will decide what the future holds for you.

    I would not be too broken up about not teaching. It's not that great a career, after all. We are not changing the world one child at a time, no matter what the most upbeat and enthusiastic amongst us may think. World-changing is a skill set belonging to slightly higher pay grades.

    Go for one of those jobs, and do better for your family.
     
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Oct 7, 2017

    I'm changing the world one kid at a time. It's an awesome job if you are good at it. If you aren't, all would be better served if you pursue another career. With that said, one year is not enough time to tell.
     
    bella84 likes this.
  5. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 7, 2017

    When you say you resigned in March, do you mean you just informed them of your resignation and worked out the rest of the school year, or did you quit in March?

    If it's the former, that's okay. If it's the latter, that might have been a bad move because then the school would have had to replace you for the last month or two of the year, which would REALLY annoy them, and you wouldn't be able to get good references from them. References and letters of rec are everything in the education job market game. If you're only working at a place temporarily your goal should aways be to get a good reference or letter of rec out of it. Even if you have bad classroom management (which is typical for first year teachers, so don't sweat it that much), if you showed good work ethic and a willingness to work with others or learn, you'll be able to get a good reference from most reasonable administrators. Even a reference from a fellow teacher would help.

    Word travels fast in a district and if one school's admin really didn't like you because of an objectively bad move like quitting mid-year without a really good reason (rather than the principal just didn't like you because your hair was green or whatever) then you will have a hard time getting hired in that district. If you did quit mid-year and you had a really good reason (illness, pregnancy, whatever), make sure you mention it in your application somewhere.

    You should still apply to the same district just in case. Not every principal talks to another and they don't always listen to each other, but that may be why you're having trouble getting hired. In general apply to any and every district within the radius you're willing to travel. A single hook with bait may or may not catch fish, but if you have 20 hooks out there with bait, there's a good chance a fish will bite one or more of them.

    I don't know how credentials work in Colorado. Over on the West Coast, a secondary credential is very different from a primary school credential. It doesn't matter what kinds of graduate degrees you have, if you don't have the right credential for the school you want to teach in, your resume will be tossed. If you worked middle school, I assume you have a secondary credential, which means high schools and middle schools will look at your applications, but you'll be dismissed if you apply for elementary schools. If you want to teach elementary school, you'll have to apply for a separate credential through your state's credentialing system.

    I would still recommend applying to middle schools even if you had a bad experience last year, not only because of the fish hook analogy but also because not every middle school is the same, and because sometimes your bad experience could have been due to any number of factors: admin, your personal classroom management experience (which should improve over time), the socioeconomic level of the community you worked in, the prevailing religious and political beliefs of the community you teach in, whatever. And that varies widely from site to site and district to district. Most teachers have a terrible first year, but those who stick to the same school for a while get better at their jobs and eventually end up loving it. If you keep changing up your grade-level, subject, and/or site, you're essentially redoing your first year all over again every time you make such a change. Spend some time in one place, grade-level, and/or subject and you might be surprised as to how experience and developed expertise in that area makes you feel after a few years.

    Also if you're teaching science you should have no problem eventually finding a job, especially if you are willing to branch out to districts slightly further away, and are willing to teach middle school and science subjects slightly outside of your comfort zone. (ex. I was planning to teach HS Biology when I first became a teacher but I got hired quickly because I was willing to teach MS physical science)
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2017
  6. Coloteacher

    Coloteacher Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2017

    Thanks for your response. I have stopped thinking about teaching as a career now. It's not worth my time and efforts. Im not a bad teacher but still I don't want to go back to any classroom, even if they pay me twice or thrice ! Instead I'm pursuing my dream career, something I always wanted to be. I'm channeling my energy into that.The district lost a good , hardworking teacher . I have nothing to lose !! :))
     
  7. Coloteacher

    Coloteacher Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2017

    Thanks for your response. Good you are enjoying being a teacher. But I must say that I'm not a bad teacher. The whole experience has forced me to chose anohjer career but I'm glad I'm doing something I always wanted to do.
     
  8. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Oct 9, 2017

    What career field are you moving into?
     
  9. Coloteacher

    Coloteacher Rookie

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    Oct 9, 2017

    I finished the school year and got very good references from admins. I have credentials to teach k-12. I have great work ethics and always willing to learn and improve on my weak areas. My admins knew this , probably thats why they gave me excellent references. I applied to almost all the possible jobs in the district . I even thought of going back to subbing in the same district. But they never called me for subbing, forget calling for full time job. I had to resubmit my application to be a sub and they never called me. All this happened over summer and by end of summer, I decided to forget about teaching as a career. I have started my own business and Im struggling but I know I will be doing great one year from now ( or even less). Thanks again for sharing your thoughts.
     
  10. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Enthusiast

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    Oct 9, 2017

    You were never going to get another job in the same district that nonrenewed you.
     
  11. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 11, 2017

    Well I wish you luck in your new business. I too left teaching to do something I always wanted to do. It's hard work but it's worthwhile in my opinion.

    Speaking on your nonrenewal though, I have a hard time understanding why they would non-renew you if they gave you such good recommendations. Were you actually non-renewed or did your position simply go to someone with more seniority? I remember I didn't get hired back at my first school I worked at but that was because my position was no longer available because it was going to someone with more seniority who wanted it. I realized that not being hired back the next year is not the same thing as non-renewal. Usually when people say non-renewal, it's because the admin documented that you were really not effective at your job, they didn't like you, and they didn't want you back the next year. That doesn't seem to be the case in this instance.
     
  12. Coloteacher

    Coloteacher Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2017

    So good to hear that you are doing something which is more meaningful to you. Yes, it's lot of hard work but I'm ready to face all the challenges in my new venture. All i know is that my sense of being is not destroyed every other day as it was in teaching. I have nothing against teaching but I'm so done with it.
    I was also confused when I read the reference letters because on one hand they said I won't be renewed and on the other hand they wrote some great points about me. It bothered me for a long time. I think they just wanted to get rid of me. That's the only explanation I can think of. I thought if I have one chance to talk to my admin team , I would ask the same question. But I'm so over it now. I dont even think about it. Infact I have deleted that one year of my life as a full time teacher in my mind, so that I can move on and pursue my other goals . I will probably never use those reference letters because they remind me of the fact that I was not wanted there for no fault of mine.
     
  13. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 15, 2017

    I wouldn't say one is more meaningful to me than another. It's just different. I want to have a diverse set of experiences in my life, and it was time to leave teaching for something else for now, but I plan on coming back to it later in life in all likelihood.
     

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