Benefits of getting a graduate degree?

Discussion in 'College' started by Peregrin5, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 1, 2011

    I'm not even a full-fledged teacher yet. Some of my programs instructors recommended that we get this Masters that can be gotten simply by taking an extra year after the credential.

    Then some instructors recommended against getting a Masters before getting actual teaching experience because of the job market and the fact that you'd have to justify the higher pay you would requisition for having a higher degree.

    Personally, I believe I am going to wait for my graduate degree for that reason and also because I want to get out and teach already as well as the fact that I don't really have money for another year.

    Actually, I have my eyes set on a graduate program at a different University involving Education, Mathematics, Science, and Technology.

    I definitely want to do that after clearing my credential in California. Problem is, I haven't decided on whether I want to go for the MA, or just go all the way for the PhD, as that program offers both. All things considered, I certainly have time to decide.

    What would be the costs and benefits of a MA vs PhD? What are the possible positions each could land me? I understand that PhDs get more funding as well, is that true?

    Also, I'm not entirely sure, but I believe that program is a full time thing, so that is another factor. Depending on which one I do, I would either have to leave teaching for 2 years or for 4 years. Which one would be wiser? Looking forward to some discussion about this!
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 1, 2011

    A masters degree enriches one professionally in many ways...I feel it gives you more insight into the learning process, teaching strategies, and broadens your 'base knowledge'...not to mention the salary bump. I do think, however, that candidates with a graduate degree and NO experience aren't very competitive...you might consider STARTING the degree (can you do it part time?) while working...having solid classroom experience will help you in your grad studies in terms of real application of what you are learning.
     
  4. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I agree with you. I am going to wait a few years after I've started teaching.

    I believe the program I am interested in is full-time because of its apprenticeship-nature.

    My current plan is to teach 2 years and clear my credential and apply to that school a year before. Then I'll take off from teaching for either 2 years or 4 depending on if I decide to go the Masters route or the PhD route.

    After that, I'll attempt to get hired again.
     
  5. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Oct 1, 2011

    I agree with this completely.

    I would also add that I feel I got more out of my master's program than the actual credential program. It has been an absolute blessing for me and allowed me to focus on creating a positive classroom climate (I chose that area to research), giving me so much more insight than I would have gotten if I had not gone through the master's.
     
  6. bondo

    bondo Cohort

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    Nov 2, 2011

    The enjoyable aspect of your master's is the ability to focus research on ceratin aspects of teaching that interest you. It is hard to determine what these aspects are without first having legitimate teaching experience.
     
  7. dabedwe

    dabedwe Rookie

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    Nov 15, 2011

    I think it is a great idea to take a little time to teach before you decide to go into a new program. A masters degree or PhD is an excellent way to move up in your employment. You would have much more opportunity for higher level jobs. However, if you take the PhD route, you would receive teaching experience through internships that would most likely be required by the program.
     
  8. Bridgebuilder

    Bridgebuilder Rookie

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    Dec 20, 2013

    Depending on what Master's you pursue, you may find that you will benefit more by getting that real world experience first. Something else to think about. I'm a HUGE fan of graduate school, provided the program is a good one, but it all depends on your goals going in. The BEST experiences come from going to grad school, simply because you LOVE to learn.

    Not to belittle those that go for pay reasons or job reasons, per se, but the people who I've seen succeed, and succeed massively at grad school, and then their careers ALL went to grad school because they loved learning and loved to study the field.

    Those that went in just to get a better job, didn't get as much out of going.
     
  9. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    Apr 11, 2014

    Although this is an old tread- I thought I'd respond.

    I'm in a similar boat. I am in a license and masters program for special education. I am taking the license courses at a graduate level.

    My course of action is to get my license first, get a teaching position THEN finish my masters. After all is said and done, I'll only have 2 classes left to finish my masters. If you are able to pursue your masters like this, it might be an effective option.
     

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