Attention Seeking Behavior

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Holyoke, Mar 27, 2019.

  1. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Apr 8, 2019

    If whatever you are doing - detention, calling parents, using the office etc. - are working you will know almost immediately. You should find the behavior becoming less and less due to the intervention until it goes away never to return. If you find no change or it becomes less for a day or two then returns it should be a signal there is something amiss with the intervention. This could mean the method is not working because it is not being performed correctly, or it is being performed correctly but is the wrong method for the particular student.
     
    Linguist92021 and Ms.Holyoke like this.
  2. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Apr 8, 2019

    I'm just not sure what to do because he likes negative attention that I give him. But if I ignore the behavior, he still gets peer attention. I might try to isolate him so he is sitting around kids who won't give him attention for his behavior. It's hard to find in this class though.
     
  3. rpan

    rpan Cohort

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    Apr 9, 2019

    Any chance he can go to a buddy class that preferably has engaged and motivated students who won’t give him the attention he craves when he is acting out particularly badly? Or is there a quiet room with admin where he doesn’t have any attention or interaction?
     
  4. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Apr 9, 2019

    We are not allowed to send kids out.

    I didn't have that class today (due to testing) but I saw a group with him and a few other kids in the hallways and not heading towards science class. I told them to get to class or they would be tardy and he yelled "we want to be tardy." They went to class and he comes back out to get water (likely without permission), the bell rang, and he yelled "now I'm tardy!"

    I spoke with another teacher who said he chose to cough loudly, fall out of his chair, etc. during standardized testing.
     
  5. Teacher234

    Teacher234 Cohort

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    Apr 9, 2019

    For the students who react to the inappropriate behavior, maybe try assigning them detention. In this case, make sure they understand that this would be the consequence for encouraging further disruptive.
    Maybe you could try a behavioral intervention plan:
    -On an index card, you could put a star for every class period he shows a good effort to behavior and remain in control. Maybe 5 stars=lunch with you or after school time with you
    For the other students:
    -Maybe you could incorporate Math Centers and assign groups at random to rotate. The math centers do not have to be play dough or polka dancing, but related to your lesson like task cards.

    If you want to go in another direction, possibly fidget toys could work.
     
  6. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Apr 10, 2019

    Good to read you are not afraid to manage students outside the classroom. Many of his antics are backtalk as was the incident in the hallway. The best way to backtalk is to have someone talk to you. If no one talks to you there is no material to frame your backtalk around. Giving verbal commands - directions, warnings etc. always run the risk some lippy student will use your speaking as the topic sentence for their backtalk. In most cases the majority of students are not looking to test the teacher, garner attention or start a fight. They remain silent and cooperate.

    If you know you are dealing with a backtalk artist based on past experience the odds go way up you will experience more of the same if you open your mouth. Staying silent when provoked is unnatural. Your brain will be screaming "Do something!" If you follow this logic your mouth tends to pop open. Out come the little gems the student will use for verbal volleyball. If you remain calm and don't speak the student has no material to build his attention getting theater act.

    Not speaking does not mean to ignore his behavior. It means to use your body as in body language to say what your mouth was going to say. With the group in the hall instead of verbally telling them, calmly walk directly at them until you are part of their group. Stand, make eye contact and say nothing. Look bored. They will not like you close by. To get rid of you they will have to move. Follow them like herding cattle. Say nothing. When they get to the door, and this is optional, finally speak, "Thanks for getting to class on time."
     
  7. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Apr 10, 2019

    Today was rough with this student. He exhibited the following behaviors:
    - Came into my class after the bell and yelled "now I'm tardy!"
    - Had a negative comment for everything that was said.
    - Pretending to spit on the floor or actually spitting on the floor. I told him I would have to speak with him after class if it continued and it did continue. He yelled "I don't care if I get written up." He left before I could pull him. I spoke with the VP about something else and told her about the spitting and she pulled him from lunch for a detention.

    I'm very confused. I have no idea if this kid hates me because it seems like it. I am going to make him stay for his detention tomorrow.
     
  8. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Apr 12, 2019

  9. ms.irene

    ms.irene Connoisseur

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    Apr 12, 2019

    I had a student that sounds a bit like yours once, although mine wouldn't/couldn't even get any work done. He was 16 but presented more like a six-year-old. He would talk to himself, sing, and call out almost non-stop. He would destroy anything I gave him -- tearing up papers into little bits, breaking pencils and pens, etc. I knew he was living in a group home and reached out to his social worker -- turns out the boy had been essentially abandoned by his drug-addicted parents and had been found living alone with his little brother, when they were about 10 and 6, respectively. They were "caught" because he was stealing food for them to eat. Not that this excused his behavior per se, but understanding why it was happening helped me be patient and keep working to try to meet him where he was.

    For your student, I would be on high alert for signs of abuse and neglect, especially given mom's reaction to your phone calls, along with the extreme behavior and emotional issues. I would look into why the girls are saying he doesn't shower -- is he malodorous? This could be a sign of neglect. If you have reasonable suspicions, call CPS.

    Also, the one thing that actually helped (a teensy bit!) with my student was forging a relationship with him, even when he was on my last nerve. I would ask him about his shoes, clothes, etc. I found out he was really into fashion and we talked about French fashion (I teach French as well as ELD, at the time). He started to at least talk about something semi-connected to class/reality. My favorite was when he decided I must drive a Bugatti because I speak French, lol! It's so hard to see past the behaviors, especially when you're trying to manage 30+ others at the same time, but there is a kid in there who needs help, I guarantee you.
     
  10. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Apr 12, 2019

    Yesterday, he was walking through the hallways yelling "I hate life!!"

    His behaviors were improved in class today and yesterday. He was less of a disruption but still seeking attention. Yelling out, etc. but it was manageable. For example, I said "I need eyes up here" and he said "no!" He asked to sit independently and the other kids are good at ignoring him.

    At the end of class, he got out of his seat and yelled to me "I'm going to recycle this...ok??" He LOVES the attention he gets by recycling his work. It is ONLY because I tell the kids to put their work in their binders. How would you handle this?

    I think he really is a sweet kid but the attention seeking behaviors are ridiculous.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2019
  11. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Apr 12, 2019

    I think it is time for an open-notes quiz!
     
  12. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Apr 12, 2019

    This kid would get an A anyways. His behavior sucks but he does really well in my class haha
     
  13. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Apr 12, 2019

    Ignore the recycling and let natural consequences happen.
     
  14. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    This is what I do. I did make him come back and pick up his work when it was thrown on the floor rather than the recycling. But I just let him recycle it and honestly this kid doesn't really need his notes. He does well anyways. But even though I ignore it, he still yells to me that he is going to recycle his work. I wonder if I just need to give him more positive attention. He likes prizes from my prize box.

    The English teacher said that he tossed an assignment that they were still working on in the recycling bin lol
     
  15. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Apr 12, 2019

    Ignore the yelling, too. Ignore all yelling unless it's interfering in the learning process. No reaction at all - complete nonissue.

    Be careful about rewarding kids who have chronic behavior issues. Read "Punished by Rewards" if you get the chance. Rewarding is different from positive attention, though. You can give praise for his doing the right thing without giving tangible items. I think the positive attention would be good for him because it's attention he wants.
     
  16. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Yeah, I give kids prizes when they complete challenges correctly if they finish their work early. That is when I reward him with prizes and he really likes to do challenges for prizes.

    I'm wondering if he likes positive attention or if he only likes negative attention?
     
  17. GemStone

    GemStone Habitué

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    Apr 13, 2019

    I'm sure he likes any attention you'll give him.
     

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