Any experience with alternate licensing?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Backroads, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jun 11, 2019

    So... I'm a teacher.

    My husband has a science degree, but has worked since college in the private security industry (and... he makes a bit more than me). But he's thinking of actually going into teaching. (shouts of support and horror).

    My state (Utah) has a few options, pretty much meaning take a test in the subject/get a job/get a mentor/pass eventual teaching standard requirements.

    But as anyone gone through an alternate route and would like to share the experience?
     
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  3. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    Jun 11, 2019

    I already had my masters (though you only need a bachelor's), so I took the Praxis I basic skills test, Praxis II content area and two education classes and my dean recommended me for a nonrenewable three year license. After I obtained a position, I took two more education classes while student teaching , and once I finished that, the dean recommended me for a standard license. It wasn't difficult at all. The whole process took like six months, but every state is different.
     
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  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Jun 11, 2019

    For me it was successful and productive. The training was inexpensive, and I earned as I learned, since I was working full time. Almost half of NJ's teachers hired in the last 10 years are AR candidates. I have acquired multiple certificates, as well as earning my MEd. at virtually no cost due to tuition reimbursement. I also earned my TOSD certificate at very little cost the same way. I know that not all schools are as generous, but I recognize my blessings. My salary is decent, having increased by $20,000 in the last 7 years. I did start with a graduate degree in place, something to consider, added a second, and I'm almost finished with a third.

    NJ hires AR candidates who are well prepared, IMO. If it is what is in a person's heart, I say go for it.
     
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  5. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    I say go on and get certified even if he never teaches or doesn't teach right now.....it's another item to put on a resume plus another avenue to income.
     
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  6. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    Jun 14, 2019

    From seeing various posts on here about finding work in education, it just furthers my belief that the alternate route is much better than traditional as far as employment because one already possesses a non-education degree and for many of us, a "private sector" degree. For us, working in education is secondary because obtaining our education degrees/licensing was secondary. It just means we have more options as far as employment goes. I personally know people who are looking for jobs in education (though we have shortages, there aren't shortages in some subjects) and they only possess degrees in education.
     
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