Advice for career change to H.S. History

Discussion in 'High School' started by nutoteaching, Nov 30, 2018.

  1. nutoteaching

    nutoteaching New Member

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    Nov 30, 2018

    Any help will be appreciated...

    I am currently in a job I grow less and less happy with.

    I do, however, love history, went to college for a BA in history, and later returned after a few years in the military for a master's in history. To be clear, I did not follow through with the master's, although, I was doing very well in it.

    I want to teach history. I want to teach only history... While I was progressing through the master's, I was told by multiple teachers advising me that I may end up as a social studies teacher and may be asked to teach economics, geography, psychology.... I lost interest. I was also told I would be teaching at a public school in an urban setting to start. Again, I lost interest. I can only see myself at a private school, probably in the suburbs.

    Is it true I may be asked to teach another subject if I go into social studies? If I go into a history teachers program, how competitive will it be on the other side?

    Is it also true teachers begin in public (urban) schools? Is there competition for private schools?

    Thank you.
     
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  3. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Nov 30, 2018

    I can't speak for all districts, but I'll tell you how mine works:
    1. High school history jobs are posted as high school social studies jobs. You could have 5 sections of geography and 1 section of government/econ. You could teach 3 sections of US history and 3 sections of world history. It all depends on the needs of the school. You get what you get.
    2. High school social studies positions are generally the most competitive. Aside from multiple subjects credentials, the second most popular credential to earn is a social science credential (that's what it's called in CA).
    3. All new teachers don't start their career in an urban school. I started out my career in a Title I, low socioeconomic school (nearly 100% free lunch). However, it was the best experience of my life. After working in several schools throughout my district, I've gleaned that kids are kids--whether they come from the projects or the golf course community.
    4. I have no info about private schools other than the fact that they make significantly less money than public school teachers (in my area, that is). They're grossly underpaid.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2018
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  4. ssgirl11

    ssgirl11 Companion

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    Nov 30, 2018

    I'm a middle school social studies teacher, so it's a little different, but I can tell you that it's probably pretty unrealistic to find a job in social studies, let alone just history. In fact, in the state of Ohio, where I live, the 7-12 degree to be a history teach is called "Integrated Social Studies." Basically, you won't even get hired as a teach if you have a history degree. Districts want to see that you are well-rounded and are able to move you around, if needed. I would re-evaluate your expectations for this one.
     
  5. Tulipteacher

    Tulipteacher Companion

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    Dec 4, 2018

    Where I am you would teach World History, American History, or Civics and Economics. You might also teach Psychology, but there are fewer sections of it since it is an elective. As a HS history teacher you would be expected to teach any of those classes.

    You would probably also be expected to coach a sport. I don't know why it is, but most of the history teachers are also coaches in my district. It would be possible but unlikely to get a history job without also being willing to coach.

    Do teachers begin in urban schools? I live in a rural area so no, in my area teachers do not begin at urban schools. I do think most private school teachers start out as public school teachers or have a personal connection to the private school (alum, parent, relative of someone).
     
  6. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Dec 5, 2018 at 1:54 AM

    Some states' public-school systems do still offer a history license that's distinct from either a generalist social-science or social-studies license or licenses in economics, geography, civics, anthropology, etc. - but fewer do this than used to even a decade ago. If you're genuinely not interested in teaching anything but history, nutoteaching, the pickings are likely to be rather shockingly slim.
     
  7. nutoteaching

    nutoteaching New Member

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    Dec 7, 2018 at 10:28 AM

    Thank you all for taking the time to reply.
     

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