14 y/o who can't read

Discussion in 'ESL/ELL' started by HeartDrama, Aug 25, 2015.

  1. HeartDrama

    HeartDrama Connoisseur

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    Aug 25, 2015

    Does anyone have any book recommendations for students who can't read? I don't mean struggling, I don't mean dyslexic, I literally mean a 14 year old who is unable to read. I distributed a survey to the class last week and when I asked him why he wasn't doing it, he stated he didn't get it. As I read the questions to him and he wrote the answers, the spelling was completely off (ie. science = sinis). I asked the SpEd dept if he had an IEP and they had just spoken with his mother, no clear answer as to whether or not there is a disability. Today they chose books for SSR and when I asked him about his choice, he stated "I can't read". I will be purchasing a book (or books) for him this evening, but I don't know what to get.
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Aug 25, 2015

  4. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Dec 22, 2015

    How is he doing now?
     
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  5. vickilyn

    vickilyn Maven

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    Dec 22, 2015

    I have a 15 year old boy who can't read this year. For science content, I find him to need pictures, so about the kindergarten level. He is classified as EBD, comes from a broken home, has strong gang affiliations, and he has multiple encounters with the law. Currently we are having him work with our ISS teacher. He totally mistrusts any teacher who is a different race than he is, and between him being lost in the instruction and teenage hormones running rampant, he is challenging, to say the least. He will not ask for help, has a history of violence, and our reading specialist refuses to work with him because of the violent threats he made against her. No teacher is supposed to be alone with this student because the possibility of violence is all too real. My heart breaks when he lets his guard down, even briefly, and you can see that he knows just how bad this situation is, but just as quick, the defenses are back up and defiance resumes. This may be the worst case I have worked with to date.
     
  6. Obadiah

    Obadiah Habitué

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    Dec 23, 2015

    I just finished a book that describes the origin of these tragedies as often occurring between birth through age 3; Suskind, Dana. Thirty Million Words: Building a Child's Brain. New York, Dutton: 2015. The less time parents/caregivers spend with children, especially in oral communication and oral reading, the more likely these children will be nonfunctioning readers by third grade. No information is given as to how to remediate illiteracy beyond age 8, but after reading, I wonder if, (by connecting previous learning with new learning), an increase in oral discussion might somewhat facilitate reading. I also wonder if an increase in orally reading to an older student would help. I haven't had a chance to check further research on this, but that's where my thoughts were going.
     
  7. Laura Wallendal

    Laura Wallendal New Member

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    Jan 5, 2016

    I recently read some growing evidence around listening comprehension to reading comprehension. There's a wonderful resource that can help with that and it's completely free for teachers and students to use (although there is a Premium version as well with some additional features). It pulls current events from NPR and the student can slow down or speed up the pace of the listening as well as follow along with the subtitles. The lessons are all categorized by grade level and subject. Check it out @ Listen Current
     
  8. miatorres

    miatorres Comrade

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    Jan 5, 2016

    This is a fantastic idea! In the past, I taught literature and history classes composed of ninth and tenth graders who literally did not know how to read. (The school system was one that simply passed students to the next grade regardless of whether they mastered basic skills.) Other teachers and I used audio recordings of poems, short stories, plays, and novels in our classrooms. It was wonderful to hear professional actors and actresses reading/acting out these literary selections. Many of the audio recordings included sound effects, which was great. I didn't rely on these audio recordings as the only sources of instruction, but they helped students to to learn many different themes of various reading selections and it was a big deal for the students.
     

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